How to deal with teenagers dating

The fall formal dance was just a week away and I was hoping a boy I liked would ask me to go with him.

There was no way I could leave the room: What if he called and I wasn’t there to answer the phone? Dorm rooms didn’t come with answering machines and the development of voice mail was light years away.

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It was late fall during my freshman year at college.

My friends and I were piled on my dorm bed, staring at the phone and willing it to ring.

My budding romance depended on whether I heard the shrill ring of an old-fashioned land-line phone. The social lives of today’s teens don’t revolve around waiting for their phones to ring.

Teens are much more likely to connect with each other through some form of social media, whether it’s Twitter, Instagram or matchmaking apps such as Tinder and Hot Or Not.

Dating customs have changed since you were a teenager.

The most striking difference is the young age at which children now begin dating: on average, twelve and a half for girls, and thirteen and a half for boys.

Think back to when you fell in love for the very first time. For me, it was freshman year and her name was Carolina. We dated all through our freshman year and into 10th grade. I even danced with her a few times—I was known to cut a rug or two back in the day.

I lived for those few moments spent in her presence. I played on the team and she danced with the pommers.

For example, if she is dating someone you don't like, remind her of the rules in your household and the consequences that go with them, but do not use the boyfriend as an example.

Tell her you expect her to be home by her curfew every night, lying is not permitted, grades must be maintained, and her behavior must be respectful and polite at all times.

These bad boys often are dangerous and inappropriate, but they turn out to be sweet guys by the end.